Saint Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church
Grand Junction, Colorado

Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople (AD 73)
Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America (AD 1922)
Greek Orthodox Metropolis of Denver (AD 1979)

METROPOLIS OF DENVER
Resources for the
“Fixed Portions” of
the Divine Services,
Service Books for
the Psaltíri
(Chanter Stand):

Parish Oktoechos
.pdf     .docx

Parish Orologion
Volume I
The Parish Order for the Daily Services and the Divine Liturgies

.pdf     .docx

Parish Orologion
Volume II
The Parish Order for the All-Night Vigil: Compline, Vespers, Matins, and 1st Hour, as well as the 3rd and 6th Hours

.pdf     .docx

Parish Orologion
Volume III
The Seasonal Katavasiai, as well as the Antiphons and Troparia at the Divine Liturgy

.pdf     .docx

Parish Orologion
Volume IV
Weekday Services of the Great Fast
A Parish Orologion for Vespers and Matins, the Presanctified Divine Liturgy as well as Great and Small Compline

.pdf     .docx

Parish Orologion
Holy Week
Volume I
A Holy Week
Parish Orologion for Vespers and Matins

.pdf     .docx

Parish Orologion
Holy Week
Volume II
A Holy Week
Parish Orologion for the Divine Liturgies and Holy Unction

.pdf     .docx
Individual Services from the Orologion
Vespers
Small Compline
Midnight Service
Matins
1st Hour
Divine Liturgy
(Chrysostom)
Divine Liturgy
(Basil)
3rd & 6th Hours
9th Hour
Agrypnia
(All-Night Vigil)

MrSAgioritikaPT Font
(Macintosh)
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Texts of Orthodox Liturgical Services

This page has been prepared exclusively for the faithful at Saint Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church in Grand Junction, Colorado. Our parish chanters (psaltes or cantors) use it to prepare for their active participation in the Divine Services. Parishioners and visitors may use it to study, and to better understand, the services as well as to more fully participate with our congregation as we glorify, praise, and thank our all-good, merciful, and loving God.

The resources available on this web page are prepared and printed only for use at Saint Nicholas parish in Grand Junction, Colorado. They are, of course, the standard, canonical (official and normative) services of the one, holy, catholic and Apostolic Orthodox Church. Moreover, these resources have been prepared in bilingual format, with the ancient, original Greek text in one column, and the English translation in a parallel column. The English translation is, wherever possible, always that prescribed by His Eminence Metropolitan Isaiah of Denver for standard use in the Greek Orthodox Metropolis of Denver.

Resources (texts) of the liturgical services celebrated at Saint Nicholas parish may be viewed and downloaded by clicking on the links in the left and right columns of this page.

A Word about
the Apostolic Origin and Historical Character
of Orthodox Liturgical Services

The liturgical services of the Orthodox Christian Church are ancient. They derived initially from the practices of Jewish Temple and Synagogue services, and were well developed in their present form during the Apostolic Age.

From the 1st three centuries mainly scattered fragments of the liturgical services have survived into the present age. This was, obviously, because of the difficult circumstances endured by Christians during that era, and the frequent persecution of the faithful and destruction of their churches and liturgical resources.

Those few fragments that have survived are completely consistent with both the order of worship as well as the phraseology of prayers and hymns from the 4th century onward.

Plentiful and thorough documentation of liturgical services exists from the 4th century, when Christianity became both legalized and normative in the Roman Empire, through the present age.

Logically, the worship practices of the 4th century were simply a continuation of what existed previously, as the fragmentary documentation from the earlier centuries attests.

Without doubt, present-day Orthodox worship is essentially and substantially the same as it has always been since the apostolic era.

The liturgical service books found being used in an Orthodox monastery, cathedral, or parish church today are nearly identical with those compiled (not composed) by Saint John of Damascus (AD 676–749) at the Mar Saba (Saint Savas) monastery near Jerusalem.


Saint John of Damascus
There have been only two significant “changes” to these service books since the eighth century. The 1st, obviously, is the addition of hymns appropriate to saints who have lived since that time. The 2nd, significantly, is the translation of these service books into the vernacular (the language or dialect spoken by the ordinary people in a particular country or region), especially into Church Slavonic in the ninth century and since the 19th century into English and other contemporary languages.

The typical (characteristic) or canonical (official) texts of the Divine Services are those that have been traditional (faithfully transmitted or handed down) in the Greek language within the Church.

It should be noted that these services of the Orthodox Church are the foundation of Roman Catholic and Protestant worship. This is obvious, since the Roman Catholic Church did not become a separate, identifiable entity from the rest of Christendom until after the eleventh century and, likewise, since the Protestant denominations directly evolved from the Roman Church in the sixteenth century.

Thus, a Roman Catholic or Protestant Christian attending liturgical services in an Orthodox Church is witnessing the faithful and living continuation of their own historical worship tradition.

The “Daily Cycle,” or “Hours of Prayer,”
in the Orthodox Church

Adapted from: http://www.orthodoxprayer.org/Hours.html

The Orthodox “liturgical day” begins at sundown. This is in accord with the account of the beginning of time in the Bible:

“In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. The earth was without form, and void; and darkness was on the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God was hovering over the face of the waters. Then God said, “Let there be light;” and there was light. And God saw the light, that it was good; and God divided the light from the darkness. God called the light Day, and the darkness He called Night. So the evening and the morning were the 1st day.” (Genesis 1:1-5)

Vespers
“Let the lifting up of my hands be an evening sacrifice” (Psalm 141).

The Orthodox Christian daily prayer cycle naturally commences with the Service of Vespers at the beginning of the liturgical day, at sundown. This was also the Jewish tradition, and is the way that Christ and His disciples prayed daily. Other terms for “Vespers” are “Evening Prayer,” “Morning Worship,” and “Evensong.”

Praying at sundown coincides with the time for lighting lamps in the times before the introduction of electrical lights. This was a definitive transition time in antiquity, something we have lost in modern society where electrical power world allows us to continue our activities despite the setting of the sun.

As the sun begins to set, the faithful come to the Church for the final prayer service of one day, the Ninth Hour (see below), and the 1st prayer service of the new day, Vespers.

The Service of Vespers begins with Psalm 103 which recounts the creation of the world. It continues with Psalm 140 reminding us of man’s fall, the hymn “O gladsome Light,” which celebrates the coming of Christ into the world, and finally the Prayer of Symeon, “Now let Your servant depart in peace, O Master,” foretelling the end of the world.

Compline
“In Peace I will both lie down and sleep, for You alone, O Lord, make me lie down in safety.” (Psalm 4).

The evening meal immediately follows the Service of Vespers. Following our supper, we again assemble for the Service of After Dinner Prayer, called “Compline.” During the service we reflect on the day and examine our actions, asking for forgiveness our shortcomings and negligence. After Compline we go to our rooms for sleep.

There are two Compline Services in the Orthodox Church. “Small Compline” is read most nights throughout the year, and “Great Compline” read on weekdays during the Great Fast (Great Lent).

Midnight Service
“At midnight I will rise and praise You.” (Psalm 118).

In the monasteries the monastics rise at midnight for prayer, a tradition that goes back at least as far as the time of the holy King and Prophet David the Psalmist.

Matins
“O God, You are my God, early will I seek You.” (Psalm 63).

Orthodox Christians rise at dawn to experience the goodness of God, to praise Him, to give Him thanks, to make petitions, and to seek His blessing for the activities of the coming day. Another terms for “Matins” is “Morning Prayer” or “Morning Worship.”

The “Hours”
Orthodox Christians also pray throughout the day. While busy and at work, they recite the Jesus Prayer: “Lord, Jesus Christ, have mercy on me.”

Wherever possible, the faithful also read “The Hours” which are short Services consisting of three Psalms, prayers, and hymns: the 1st Hour, 3rd Hour, 6th Hour, and Ninth Hour.

1st Hour
“To You I pray, O Lord; in the morning You hear my voice.” (Psalm 5).

Before the use of clocks the hours of the day were determined from sunrise, so the 1st hour is just after dawn. This is also the hour of the day at which Christ was led into the Praetorium before Pilate.

Nominally we understand the “1st hour” of the day to be 6:00 am, and by custom we read the 1st Hour immediately following Matins. In monasteries the Midnight Service, Matins, and the 1st Hour are read and chanted as one continuous liturgical service, usually followed by the Divine Liturgy.

In prayer at the 1st Hour we ask God to guard us from harm to our body and our soul. As our senses are being awakened from sleep we ask for spiritual awakening through Jesus Christ Who is the “True Light Who comes into the world.”

3rd Hour
“Take not Your Holy Spirit from me.” (Psalm 50).

Nominally the 3rd Hour is at 9:00 am, the hour when Christ was condemned by Pilate, and the hour when the Holy Spirit came down upon the apostles at Pentecost. We thanks God for this gift and ask that He never deprive us of the fruits and graces of the Holy Spirit.

6th Hour
“There they crucified Him... about the 6th hour.” (Luke 23:33, 44).

Nominally the 6th Hour is at noon, the time when the crucifixion of Christ began. As we contemplate the depth of divine love, we humbly thank Christ for all that He endured for our salvation.

Ninth Hour
“And at the ninth hour ... Jesus cried out with a loud voice, and breathed His last.” (Mark 15:34, 37).

Nominally the Ninth Hour is at 3:00 pm, the hour when Jesus promised the repentant thief that he would enter the Kingdom of heaven, and also the hour at which Jesus Himself died on the Cross.

The Ninth Hour is the final prayer service of the day, and it immediately precedes the Service of Vespers. This signifies that time is continuous, and that w on earth emulate, as much as possible, the angels in heaven who continuously praise and glorify God.

“Variables”
Clergy Resources
Laity Resources
Liturgical Links
Resources for the
“Variable Portions” of
the Divine Services,
Materials for
the Psaltíri
(Chanter Stand):

Kanonion of the Great Church of Christ
(of the Ecumenical Patriarchate)

Greek     English

Typikon of the Great Church of Christ
(of the Ecumenical Patriarchate)

weblink

Weekly Typikon
(Greek & English):

July 2, 2017
Resources for
Clergy:

Denver Metropolis
Ieratikon
(Priest’s Service Book)

.pdf     .docx

St Nicholas Parish
Ieratikon
(Priest’s Service Book)

.pdf     .docx

Liturgical Guides
(Single-Page Laminates)

weblink
Resources for
Laity:

St Nicholas Parish
Pew Service Book

.pdf     .docx
Ἑλληνικὰ Λειτουργικὰ Κείμενα τῆς Ὀρθόδοξης Ἐκκλησίας
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AGES
Digital Chant Stand

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The Orthodox Pages
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Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America
Liturgical Texts

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Antiochian Orthodox Archdiocese
Liturgical Texts

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Orthodox Church in America
Liturgical Texts

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Email: fr.luke@denver.goarch.org
© 2003-2017, Saint Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church
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